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    • #10308
      murray reid
      Participant

      Those of you with lovely varnished transoms (Trevor) were they originally like this? or did you veneer it? While working on mine I discovered it is solid mahogany at the top and plywood below the rudder cut out. Do you think it has been repaired or is this original?

    • #10309
      Trevor Thompson
      Participant

      Hi,

       

      Your transom is original – that seems to be how they made them. Mine is the same. I had to rebuild the transom on Calista. The bottom 8 inches was totally rotten, as was the keelson as far as the “P” bracket. Quite a daunting repair! So I cut back the transom in steps and fitted veneer in in stages to laminate up “ply” in situe. Of course I also scarfed in a new section of keelson and a new sandkeel. That left the transom sound but clearly repaired.

       

      The transom is a very important part of a boat, and how it appears is quite an issue – well that is how it seems to me. The transom is something of a statement about the boat.

      After much thought I used a circular saw to cut slots 2.5mm deep all over the transom, and then removed the rest with a chisel, to leave a flat surface 2.5mm below the proper finished surface level. I then veneered it in three sections, the top section in a single length covering the solid wooden section, and the rest in a port and starboard section. It resulted in a finished veneer level with the original level, but in clean new wood. The only negative is with the holes left by the staples. They are visible in the vinished varnishwork, an I havnt worked out how to hide them properly.

       

      Of course I have done something similar in the cockpit. I will take some photos when I go out to Calista this afternoon.

       

      Of course it then took a lot of sanding and varnishing.

       

       

    • #10310
      murray reid
      Participant

      I was looking for the photo I took of Calista’s transom at Beale park, but couldnt find it, but this is one you of yours which shows it nicely. I dont remember noticing any staple marks, maybe you see the detail because you are aware of it, I just admired the overall picture!

      How did you go about scarfing in a section of keelson? did you have to cut the planking back?

    • #10311
      colin twyford
      Participant

      A161 “Amber Ellen” was completely renovated by Adrian Rivett over 3 years from about 1992, during the refit I recall that he diagonally strip laminated the complete transom from a centre line to the sides, it looked very attractive.  He also did the same effect on the fore bulkhead in the cockpit.  The whole boat was varnished with Coppercoat antifoul.  He sold her in 1995 and she has changed hands a couple of times since then.  Sadly the current owner does not appear as a member.

       

      Colin

    • #10312
      murray reid
      Participant


      Did Calista’s bottom look anything like this?  

      This is what remains of the bolts that held Methuselah’s skeg on and the planking under it. I will have to replace the planking from the transom forward to the engine bay, from the centerline out to about 300mm. My plan is to cut the planking back to the new (thicker, wider) stringers I have put in, then put in the first layer of veneer, then router out to the next stringer etc, so the repair is stepped. Getting those rusty old bolts out of the keelson wont be easy, the keelson itself is ok, although I will have to drill out the bolt holes to good timber, then plug them once the bolts have been removed.  

      How did you do Calista’s?

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

       

      Trevor Thompson said:

      Hi,

       

      Your transom is original – that seems to be how they made them. Mine is the same. I had to rebuild the transom on Calista. The bottom 8 inches was totally rotten, as was the keelson as far as the “P” bracket. Quite a daunting repair! So I cut back the transom in steps and fitted veneer in in stages to laminate up “ply” in situe. Of course I also scarfed in a new section of keelson and a new sandkeel. That left the transom sound but clearly repaired.

       

      The transom is a very important part of a boat, and how it appears is quite an issue – well that is how it seems to me. The transom is something of a statement about the boat.

      After much thought I used a circular saw to cut slots 2.5mm deep all over the transom, and then removed the rest with a chisel, to leave a flat surface 2.5mm below the proper finished surface level. I then veneered it in three sections, the top section in a single length covering the solid wooden section, and the rest in a port and starboard section. It resulted in a finished veneer level with the original level, but in clean new wood. The only negative is with the holes left by the staples. They are visible in the vinished varnishwork, an I havnt worked out how to hide them properly.

       

      Of course I have done something similar in the cockpit. I will take some photos when I go out to Calista this afternoon.

       

      Of course it then took a lot of sanding and varnishing.

       

       

    • #10313
      Trevor Thompson
      Participant

      Nice to see the photo of Calista!

       

      Adding the new section of keelson. Luckily the planking was in reasonable condition, and after removing the old skeg (yes the bolts were rusted through and it almost fell off), I cut out the damage to the transom. I then cut out the damaged keelson – big hole in the back – quite daunting! I removed the keelson with hand tools mainly, that which was in poor condition was easily broken up and then the decent bit had to be cut with chissel and hammer. I had to make the scarf by eye with a pattern, hammer and chissel. It was probably not perfect, but close enough to the new section which was much easier to shape on the bench (I could get power tools to it).  I have not used bolts on the new skeg by the way, it is held on entirely by epoxy. There is a section of the skeg which fits onto the back of the transom, which helps support it from sideways movement.

       

      I have lots of photos somewhere – but cant find them quickly. Will see what I can find.

    • #10314
      colin twyford
      Participant

      When I replaced my skeg I used stainless bolts through the keelson and drilled out holes in the skeg to fit on the nuts before sealing and filling the holes.  I think I also added a couple of screwbolts as “Belt & Braces”.

       

      Colin 

    • #10315
      Timothy Mallette
      Participant

      Blue Goose has a solid transom plank at the top as well, I believe the purpose of this is for durability…

      sealing off the plywood end grain by design where water runoff from the deck would likely cause damage.

      Only the edges of the existing deck planks along the transom where drainage is diverted have rot on A77.

    • #10316
      Timothy Mallette
      Participant

      However, the skeg looks like its been eaten by termites and borers, they stopped at the planking… must be something

      in the glue.

    • #10317
      Trevor Thompson
      Participant

       sar

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