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This topic contains 2 replies, has 3 voices, and was last updated by  Chris Green 10 hours, 7 minutes ago.

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  • #18516

    sczapie2
    Participant

    Hello all, I am in the process of re-acquainting myself with the same Atalanta-26 I had my first affair with 42 years ago.  She is a bit like me, in need of some tlc J,  so I am looking at various refit ideas with the aim of cruising down the French canals followed by an extended tour of the med.  I expect to be sailing single-handed for most of the time!

    I would really appreciate your feedback on the ideas I am considering, perhaps you have already implemented them, or have discovered alternatives or rejected the idea for reasons I have not thought of.  I would also welcome any additional suggestions that would be appropriate for my trip.

    So in no particular order, the list includes :-

    Holding tanks – to comply with various EU and local laws
    A Bimini – possibly needing raising the goose neck to give sufficient headroom
    Rejigging the pushpit to incorporate a swimming ladder, a platform for stern-to mooring
    Adding a frame/arch to support solar panelling, most likely added to the pushpit
    Installing some form of bowsprit incorporating anchor guide, bow roller, tack point for a code 0/1.
    Adding an electric windlass – principally to aid stern-to mooring single-handed with the aid of an anchor.
    Fitting boom roller reefing – means reefing and sail management can be controlled from the cockpit
    Tailored storage points for the rib/dinky on the rear deck – but this would impact access via the rear platform – is the idea of a foldable dinghy (a la Seahopper) a sensible option?
    Autohelm versus mechanical self steering gear.  Eg Navico TP1800 Tillerpilot?
    Installing an ice box with a cooling powered by the solar panelling
    Adding extra portlights or hatches to increase airflow and natural lighting in fore and rear cabins.
    Replacement  inboard motor required – suitable power rating  and make which would be easy to maintain in France/the med.
    230v shore power with distribution MCB board.
    Many thanks in advance for any feedback…

    Stephan

     

  • #18519

    AOA
    Keymaster

    Stephan

    It sounds like a great adventure – both sorting the boat and then the voyage.

    There are people who will have a lot of insight into your ideas based on their own similar voyages.  A102 Atalanta Mary travelled through the Canals and had a period sailing around Corsica, Sardnia and the Italian and French coasts.  T10 has travelled extensively in the Adriatic (as the base for the authors of the Imray Adriatic Pilot). A105 is being prepared for a similar trip.  I will leave them to give you their ideas (or you might want to chase them up through the Association Yearbook).

    My comments are less about the requirements of the canals and the Med, more about the boat.

    I am not a fan of loading Atalantas up with every modern ‘convenience’ you might expect in a modern cruising yacht.  The Atalantas were designed as light-weight but very sea-worthy cruising yachts. Adding weight detracts from both the aesthetic appeal of the boats (subjective) and the way they perform.   Every additional kilogramme should be challenged as to why you really need it.

    That said, some personal opinion specifics:

    • Holding tanks – check the T10 boat page to locate Trevor’s articles on fitting a tank to Calista.  Atalanta Mary did not have a tank.
    • Bimini –  Again T10 Calista has a smart arrangement. The height of the Atalanta boom (Calistsa is a Titania) may limit options whilst sailing. Reducing the sail area by raising the boom, particularly in the Med, may not be the best option.  Of course you could lengthen the mast raising the whole sail-plan ……..
    • Bowsprit – a lightweight affair for Code 0/1 great idea (see Technical Paper P)
    • Solar Panels – see experience from A105 Atalanta Mary and A169 Elle. There are some great flexible panels out there that can be included as part of the bimini, sailcover, hatchcover or similar without a heavy structure to support them
    • Electric Windlass. Personally not convinced this is necessary based on my reading of other’s experiences. It would have to be deemed essential in my view to justify the weight and complexity (deck reinforcing, electrical system).
    • Boom roller -reefing. Handling from the cockpit does not require this. A14 Helene has slab-reefing and the main is easily raised, lowered and reefed single-handed from the cockpit (see 2017-18 Bulletin). Adding lazy jacks would make it even better. And the slab-reefing gives a better shape than roller-reefing.
    • Dinghy storage on the sterndeck. The wrong place for weight. Some boats carried their Dinky there but its a lot of faff! Particularly for the Mark 2 Atalantas which have a slightly shorter stern deck than say Dervorguila.  The Seahopper idea has been taken up by A169 Elle (see her boat page).  Personally I love a hard dinghy but I would either accept towing it (which I do in the UK) or a Seahopper / folding canoe / inflatable.
    • Auxiliary motor. Why not electric? Depends on your sailing / motoring habits but some great options out there.

    Lots of options, lots of opinions, lots of compromise required. That’s boats and sailing!

    Cheers

    Nick

  • #18532

    Chris Green
    Participant

    Hi Stephan

     The resources of the AOA website are very useful containing experience of members from Bulletin records; technical plans and ideas etc to help with your plans. I have been refitting (rebuilding!) A169  over a number of years – previously owned A 100 – here are some thoughts on my own experience of some of your proposed mod’s;

    Holding tanks – to comply with various EU and local laws 

    Location below cockpit seat is my preference – This is made easier if the head is relocated to aft cabin as in A100 (Jaunty) and A169 (Elle);  a pump-out/extract can be fitted into the top for emptying using marina suction hose etc. A simple valve arrangement allows switching between direct outlet and holding tank. Flexible or rigid tanks are available if you shop around – or possibly make your own from epoxy coated ply. If keeping the heads in fo’c’sle – a tank could be made to fit the area, but space would be a possible issue.

    Bimini – possibly needing raising the goose neck to give sufficient headroom

    See my post last year on fitting the cockpit tent and rebuilding the mast with a sliding goose neck fitting.

    Rejigging the pushpit to incorporate a swimming ladder, a platform for stern-to mooring
    Adding a frame/arch to support solar panelling, most likely added to the pushpit
    Installing some form of bowsprit incorporating anchor guide, bow roller, tack point for a code 0/1.
    Adding an electric windlass – principally to aid stern-to mooring single-handed with the aid of an anchor.
    Fitting boom roller reefing – means reefing and sail management can be controlled from the cockpit

    Not sure that adding a “sugar scoop” arrangement around the transom mounted lifting rudder is feesible;   transom mounted bathing / boarding ladders are fitted by many owners – I have a folding  stainless steel version on A169 (and previously on A 100). The fore-deck arrangements are possible, if you were determined to incorporate them, but  would add considerable clutter for fairly light ground tackle; similarly,  the cockpit arch  would also be adding windage and clutter for the proposed stern-to mooring maneuvers, bearing in mind that Atalantas are light displacement.   

    Tailored storage points for the rib/dinky on the rear deck – but this would impact access via the rear platform – is the idea of a foldable dinghy (a la Seahopper) a sensible option?

    Aft deck was designed to carry a tender and also doubles as extra aft cabin headroom with the hatch open. I have a modified Seahopper as a tender and have seen at least one other Atalanta with a Seahopper on the aft deck. I would say a perfect choice for the Atalanta. Can be stored folded along the pushpit rail/ when not required.
    Autohelm versus mechanical self steering gear.  Eg Navico TP1800 Tillerpilot?

    If you mean wind vane versus electric tiller pilot/auto helm  – both forms have been successfully used on Atalantas – have a look through the back editions of  bulletins. Personally, I have used a number of tiller (and wheel) pilots on different boats over the years; a Simrad TP10 was the last one I used, which was perfectly adequate for an Atalanta. There was a forum discussion on mechanical wind-vanes which you could probably find -or why no start a new wind-vane topic. I know that a previous owner of A169 had one fitted back in the 70s.  Another thought is self steering from the sheets with surgical bungee cord through the whipstaff / tiller. A number of these set-ups on youtube – here is a link (URL) to one:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zHpyvxeK2I4

    Installing an ice box with a cooling powered by the solar panelling

    I have 2 x 1000V  flexible roll-up panels on A169 deployed over the cockpit tent (there was a post on this); these provide sufficient charge for a bank of batteries for the 48V – 8kw electric motor; also have an aft mounted wind 200W  wind charger (also a post on this installation). This level of charge maintains the  battery bank. Not sure you would be able to run a fridge cooler from solar alone – would depend on the cool-box capacity etc. 

    Adding extra portlights or hatches to increase airflow and natural lighting in fore and rear cabins.

    A straightforward job – worth checking on the AOA forum for salvage Atalanta portlights, but these can be fabricated; At least one  Atalanta has fitted a standard (i.e. opening type) porthole through the transom.

    Replacement  inboard motor required – suitable power rating  and make which would be easy to maintain in France/the med.

    Various approaches to inboard auxiliary motors have been tried by owners over the years – suggest have a look through the back issues of the annual bulletin. It largely depends on what uses you are planning – long motoring stints across the channel in calm weather, or just getting in and out of  harbour/berths etc.

    230v shore power with distribution MCB board.

    Straightforward matter – choose the siting of the shore supply inlet; run the 240V mains lead to an on board breaker switch and fused distribution panel.

    NB: You can look up my posts covering refit issues noted above under A169 in the AOA  Register (from the tab on the top menu bar (above).

    A169 https://atalantaowners.org/boat-sn/a169/

    I hope this is helpful Stephan.

    Chris

     

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